!!!!!.png
ENERGY GROUP, INC. ELECTRICAL HAZARDS AWARENESS PROGRAM (EHAP) POLICY
 
Electrical Hazard Recognition
 
Each employee shall be trained to recognize and be qualified to work within proximity to electrical hazards that are applicable to the employee's assignment.
 
All overhead and underground electrical conductors and all communication wires and cables shall be considered energized with potentially fatal voltages.
 
Workers shall understand that:
 
  • Electrical shock will occur when a person, by either direct contact or indirect contact with an energized electrical conductor, provides a path for the flow of electricity to a grounded object or to the ground itself. Simultaneous contact with two energized conductors’ phase to phase will also cause electric shock that may result in serious or fatal injury.
    Electrical shock may occur because of ground fault when a person stands near a grounded object.
    In the event of a downed energized electrical conductor or energized grounded object, there exists the hazard of step potential.
    If the minimum approach distance cannot be maintained during operations, the electrical system owner/operator shall be advised, and an electrical hazard abatement plan implemented before any work is performed in proximity to energized electrical conductors.
 
Nonconductive Equipment

Nonconductive equipment includes wood or fiberglass tools, ropes and wood or fiberglass ladders. THESE TOOLS BECOME CONDUCTIVE IF THEY ARE WET OR DIRTY!! A rope or tool that is wet or that is contaminated to the extent that its insulating capacity is impaired, is not to be considered insulated, and may not be used near exposed energy lines. Footwear, including lineman's overshoes or those with electrical-resistant soles, shall not be considered as providing any measure of safety from electrical hazards. Rubber gloves, with or without leather, or other protective covering, shall not be considered as providing any measure of safety from electrical hazards. Ladders, platforms, booms, buckets, or any part of an aerial device or piece of equipment shall not be allowed to make contact or violate minimum approach distances with energized electrical conductors, poles, or similar conductive objects.

Equipment brought into contact with energized electrical conductors shall be considered energized. Contact by people and/or equipment shall be avoided. Operations shall be suspended when adverse weather conditions or emergency conditions develop involving energized electrical conductors. Electrical system owners/operators shall be notified immediately.

Workers performing operations after a storm or under similar conditions shall be trained in the special hazards associated with
this type of work.

Minimum Approach Distance (MAD):
 
Workers should remain ten feet from energized conductors whenever possible. All workers shall maintain the following minimum approach distances from all energized conductors:
MAD.jpg
MAD 2.jpg
Substation Safety
 
Utility company security procedures will be followed when working in substations. Required Personal Protective equipment for working inside substations includes: Hard Hat, Safety Glasses, Steel Toed Work Boots, and FR clothing. FR clothing MUST be the outer layer of clothing. Reflective vests are not FR and must be removed before entering substations. Substation gates must remain locked unless a worker is assigned to guard the gate.
 
If any damage to the facilities is encountered or caused, the utility SHALL be notified immediately. Minimum approach distances SHALL be maintained for all electrical equipment. It may be necessary to assign a worker to watch the equipment during operation, to maintain minimum approach. If this is necessary, the assigned worker shall not be performing any other work while performing this duty.
 
Never carry tools, materials, or equipment above shoulder level within substations. When driving vehicles or equipment within substations, the operator shall not drive over cable covers, underground cables, or near substation equipment. Do not drive under energized conductors unless minimum separation can be maintained. Drive less than ten miles per hour within substations. Workers shall not come in contact with vehicles or equipment that are in proximity to energized facilities.

Working in Proximity to Electrical Hazards
 
An inspection shall be made by a qualified arborist to determine whether an electrical hazard exists before: climbing, otherwise entering, or performing work in or on a tree.
 
  • Only qualified line-clearance arborists or qualified line-clearance arborist trainees shall be assigned to work where an electrical hazard exists. Qualified line-clearance arborist trainees shall be under the direct supervision of qualified line-clearance arborists.
  • A second qualified line-clearance arborist or line-clearance arborist trainee shall be within visual or voice communication, during line-clearing operations. This applies when aloft, if an arborist must approach closer than 10 feet (3.05 m) to any energized electrical conductor more than 750 volts (primary conductor) or when branches or limbs are being removed. (If they cannot first be cut, with a nonconductive pole pruner/pole saw to sufficiently clear electrical conductors, to avoid contact.) Roping is required to remove branches or limbs from such electrical conductors.
  • Qualified line-clearance arborists and line-clearance arborist trainees shall maintain minimum approach distances for qualified arborists, from energized electrical conductors. All other arborists and other workers shall maintain a minimum approach distance, for non- qualified arborists, from energized electrical conductors.
  • Branches hanging on an energized electrical conductor shall be removed using nonconductive equipment, only by a qualified line-clearance arborist or line-clearance arborist trainee. The tie- in position should be above the work area and located in such a way that a slip would swing the arborist away from any energized electrical conductor or other identified hazard. While climbing, the arborist should climb on the side of the tree that is away from energized electrical conductors while maintaining the required distances. Footwear, including lineman's overshoes or those with electrical-resistant soles, shall not be considered as providing any measure of safety from electrical hazards. Rubber gloves, with or without leather or other protective covering, shall not be considered as providing safety from electrical hazards.
  • A rope or tool that is wet, or that is contaminated to the extent that its insulating capacity is impaired is not to be considered insulated and may not be used near exposed energy lines.
  • Ladders, platforms, booms, buckets, or any part of an aerial device shall not be allowed to make contact or violate minimum approach distances, with energized conductive objects.
  • Aerial devices with attached equipment brought into contact with energized electrical conductors, shall be considered energized. Contact by people and/or equipment shall be avoided.
  • Line clearance shall not be performed during adverse weather conditions such as: thunderstorms, high winds, and snow and ice storms. Qualified line-clearance arborists and qualified line-clearance arborist trainees, performing line clearance after a storm or under similar conditions, shall be trained in the special hazards associated with this type of work.
  • Line-clearance operations shall be suspended when: adverse weather conditions or emergency conditions develop, involving energized electrical conductors. Electrical system owners/operators shall be notified immediately. Manufacturers Manuals and OSHA regulations SHALL be used for training on the SAFE use, maintenance, and repair of all equipment.